Coral ID is the encyclopedia for coral species.

Due to the large number of corals that are available for the saltwater aquarium, the naming of individual color morphs with creative fantasy names (=ID, which means coral identification) has developed internationally in addition to the scientifically correct species name.

The result is an almost unmanageable number of "popular science" names, which are an important classification, especially among collectors and for sale.

In our coral lexicon you will find corals that we have sold so far with the names that we use and recommendations for the care of the corals as well as, if available, links to available corals in our shop. If we don't have these animals in stock at the moment, you can leave your email address. You will receive an automated email as soon as the coral is available.

The lexicon is constantly being expanded, so please keep checking back.



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Acanthastrea is a genus of stony corals, which belongs to the absolute classics in the aquarium among the LPS (large polyp stony corals). By now, the most popular species, Acanthastrea lordhowensis, has been moved to the genus Micromussa as Micromussa lordhowensis, but since the CITES authorities have not yet followed suit here, the trade and we continue to list the species as Acanthastrea. Acanthastrea are characterized by vibrant, wildly colored morphs, of which a variety exist with different patterns.

Another species that Acanthastrea has lost in recent revisions is A. bowerbanki, now Homophyllia bowerbanki, whose situation is similar. In addition, the genus has gained the species Acanthastrea pachysepta, formerly Lobophyllia pachysepta. Other known species, which (still) belong to Acanthastrea, are for example the flat growing Acanthastrea echinata, which grows similar to Chalices. Furthermore there are species of little importance like A. ishigakensis, A. brevis, A. hemprichii or A. minuta, which are normally not commercially available. Acanthastrea are hardy corals that are less demanding on water quality. But you should keep an eye on the carbonate hardness, because they easily get weak if the level is too low - in our aquarium a level above KH 8 has proven to be good.

They need nutrient-rich water with clearly detectable phosphate and nitrate, or active feeding with powdered food, frozen food or LPS pellets. They are more colorful when kept in lower nutrient conditions, but they are also very susceptible. Acanthastrea are often found in colder water, sometimes even dropping below 20°C in natural sites, and often become more colorful in colder aquarium water than at higher temperatures. They require moderate current and only rather dim light, otherwise they will become distressed and burn.

When it comes to lighting for Acanthastrea, a high blue light level not only leads to better fluorescence, but also leads to better coloration in the long run. Most popular are the "Acanthastrea" lordhowensis, also just called "Acan Lord" because it has the most extreme color morphs. Gray-purple and green are very common, red uncommon, pink rather rare and very rarely yellow or orange variants. Many suppliers divide Acanthastrea into "Grades" going from normal to "Ultra" or "Rainbow". So the "Rainbow" or "Ultra grade" Acanthastrea are the absolute best colored and rarest individuals, often with yellow/orange and several other colors at the same time.

Acanthophyllia coral is a former stony coral genus that lives as a solitary polyp in the reef. It was monotypic with only one species, Acanthophyllia deshayesiana. Genetic studies have shown that the known populations were identical to Cynarina lacrymalis, so Acanthophyllia is normally referred to by that name in scientific circles today.

However, in contrast to the typical Cynarina coloration, the variants formerly running under Acanthophyllia often have more massive tissue expansion, grow much larger, and are usually not transparent, which is why we still make the distinction. Differentiation from other similarly growing corals causes problems for some people, which is why the distinction from Scolymia or Homophyllia or "Indophyllia" (which is now also counted as Cynarina) is sometimes fuzzy - many of these species are also called Donut Coral or "Meat Coral".

In principle Acanthophyllia is a good-natured coral, which has few demands on the water quality in the aquarium. The flow and light or illumination should be weak. As a rule, this stony coral only stings rather weakly, and can sometimes even have tissue contact with other corals such as Trachyphyllia without stinging them right away, but to be on the safe side, you should still place it at a distance. The tissue expansion can be tremendous if it likes the spot. It can be placed on the substrate very well. At night or when feeding, which is possible with pellets or frozen food, the coral shows an impressive tentacle ring at the oral opening, which is hidden under the tissue during the day. The animals are especially susceptible to mechanical injuries, which is why caution is required when handling them.

Acropora is the most species-rich genus among the small polyp stony corals. The exact determination of different species is often difficult due to the interconnected evolution of this genus, and causes difficulties even for experts.

Typical for Acropora is that at the end of branches there is a single polyp. There are both flat table-shaped and branched growing species, which are then called table corals or staghorn corals.

Acropora became popular from the mid 90's after the so-called Berlin system (with skimmer and live rock) made keeping them possible. They have high demands on water quality and require intense lighting, which makes them demanding to keep. However, under the right conditions they grow quite fast and show their full splendor.

Acropora SPS are easy to propagate by frags, which can also be easily snipped off with pliers and glued on with super glue. Therefore they are widely spread in the marine aquarium hobby and are often traded among aquarists, which also brings many different fantasy names for the different color morphs. Under blue light with orange filter, amazing colors often appear, for example Acropora tenuis Walt Disney or Homewrecker, Acropora microclados Strawberry Shortcake or Acropora echinata Icefire.

Acropora abrotanoides

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Acropora abrotanoides

Acropora chesterfieldensis

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Acropora chesterfieldensis

Acropora gomezi

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Acropora gomezi

Acropora hyacinthus

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Acropora hyacinthus

Acropora hyacinthus Fantasia

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Acropora hyacinthus Fantasia

Acropora insignis

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Acropora insignis

Acropora lokani Banana

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Acropora lokani Banana

Acropora microclados is a characteristic but not common species of the reef crests of Australia, but it is in principle widespread in the Indo-Pacific and also known from Indonesia from several locations. It grows as a corymbose clump (bouquet-like in irregularly distributed branches, but all ending on the same level), typical are the tubular corallites, of which single ones like to protrude at the ends. The typical coloration with green skin and red corallites is called Strawberry Shortcake, in Indonesia, where it is partly propagated in mariculture, it is also called "Bali Shortcake". But there are also other, mostly unicolored, red or green color forms. Similar species are Acropora lamarcki, Acropora macrostoma, Acropora massawensis, Acropory cytherea or Acropora anthocercis, the exact determination is again, especially purely on sight, nearly impossible. It best needs perfect water conditions with very low nutrients, strong lighting and strong current to show its full  splendor.

Acropora millepora belongs to the absolute Acropora classics and is distributed in the western Indopacific from Africa to Australia and Japan. The species is mass propagated in Indonesia by mariculture as cultured coral and is probably the most common Acropora species in marine aquaristics, together with Acropora tenuis. It grows in clumps of corymbose branches, the uniformly sized radial corallites have a prominent lower lip, giving them a scale-like, grooved appearance. The exact identification is difficult, because there are several very similar species, which are difficult to distinguish in photos and living animals - possibly it would be more correct to talk about a species complex for the traded animals, because an exact and correct identification is rather a matter of luck. Similar species are for example Acropora hyacinthus, Acropora spathulata, Acropora convexa, and sometimes even Acropora tenuis. The species Acropora prostrata is now considered a synonym of Acropora millepora, but it can still be found under that name. Typical colors are green or pink, popular but rarer are also purple or blue color varieties, sometimes with different colored tips or multicolored iridescent as "Rainbow" millepora. Acropora millepora belongs to the easier Acropora and forgives even a few small blunders with the water parameters and sometimes tolerates a little more nutrients. In general, however, the water quality should be extremely low in nutrients, with high current and high light intensity. Especially with blue light and the use of a filter spectacular color impressions can be created.

Acropora natalensis

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Acropora natalensis

Acropora sarmentosa

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Acropora sarmentosa

Acropora secale Joker

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Acropora secale Joker

Acropora subulata

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Acropora subulata

Acropora subulata Electric Spark

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Acropora subulata Electric Spark

Acropora tenuis belongs to the most frequently traded Acropora species in marine aquaristics. It is mass propagated in Indonesia in mariculture as cultured coral and is a real export hit. It is distributed from the Red Sea through the Indo-Pacific to the islands of the Central Pacific. It often grows corymbose - that is branched with branches of similar length in a clump. The radial corallites are characteristically scale-shaped with a clearly visible lip, and the terminal polyps are tubularly round. Visually similar species are Acropora selago with longer branches, Acropora vermiculata with thicker branches, and Acropora convexa and Acropora eurystoma; visual differentiation without microscopic examination of the skeletal structure on the dead specimen is more a matter of luck. Some of the most popular color forms of SPS in general belong to this species, for example the legendary Walt Disney and Homewrecker color morphs, both of which produce "red" or pink colors under blue light + filter. Acropora tenuis is still one of the more well-behaved species as far as Acropora and its care requirements are concerned - it often grows reasonably well even with suboptimal water values, although it is optimal with almost undetectable nutrients, strong current and strong lighting.

Acropora valida

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Acropora valida

Alcyonium is a genus of soft corals from the family Alcyoniidae named after it, better known as leather corals. Beside the tropical species, which are interesting for us, many species from cold water areas are found in this genus, whose distribution includes for example the Mediterranean Sea or the northern Atlantic Ocean or South Pacific. Therefore there are many azooxanthellate species in Alcyonium, which live in cold water as filter feeders on plankton.

For example, the dead sea hand Alcyonium digitatum, which occurs from the Baltic Sea over the North Sea, the Channel coast, the European Atlantic to the Mediterranean, or Alcyonium palmatum, the red dead sea hand, which populates the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic coast. These azooxanthellate soft corals require clean water and must be fed on fine plankton, which is often unsuccessful over a long period of time.

However, the keeping of these Alcyonium in the aquarium often fails already because of the mandatory water cooling for corals from the Mediterranean Sea.
More interesting for us as marine aquarists are thus the tropical species, which possess zooxanthellae and are photosynthetic that way. The only species really common here is Alcyonium versefeldtii, which forms small cushions and has a really spectacular blue-green coloration. Fortunately, it is very easy to keep, with few demands on water quality. It can tolerate a little more light - if it is placed too shady, the growth stretches conspicuously upwards.

Alcyonium versefeldtii

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Alcyonium versefeldtii

Alveopora are called flower pot corals and are related to Goniopora and Bernadpora. The difference between corals of the genus Alveopora and Goniopora is the number of tentacles on the polyps: Alveopora have 12 tentacles, whereas Goniopora have 24 tentacles.

The length and size of the polyps of the corals can vary between the different species. Usually no exact species classification is possible anyway, because the differences are too small. Green and gray color forms are common, sometimes in different pastel shades.

Keeping Alveopora flower pot corals can be demanding. Flower Pot corals are mostly found in lagoons, often with high turbidity and changing currents. It is therefore best to give them a shaded spot with varied but gentle flow. They thrive best with slightly elevated nutrient levels, and they like to be fed additional fine planctonic dry or live foods. If they do not open, try placing them in a different location.

Anthelia is a soft coral genus. They have a flat basal tissue covering the rock, from which long polyps protrude. They look similar to xenia, but usually do not pump, or similar to Clavularia tube corals, but have no stolon into which to retreat. They are referred to by trivial names as clove coral.

Anthelia has no special demands on water quality or lighting and thus can be maintained in almost any aquarium. It is beneficial to add trace elements such as iodine and halogens, as is the case with many soft corals. At high nutrient levels Anthelia can easily proliferate, so they should be placed away from the main reef structure. Although they do not sting, they can overgrow other corals and shade them so much that they die.

Australomussa was a former LPS coral genus that was monotypic with the sole species Australomussa rowleyensis - because nowadays, the species - after a short excursion to the genus Parascolymia – has been rolled into the genus Lobophyllia as Lobophyllia rowleyensis. So strictly speaking, Australomussa do not exist anymore. Practically, however, the species is still present at the CITES level, because the species definitions of the authorities always lag a few years behind the taxonomists, so the name remains with us in the trade. After all, we have no desire for lengthy discussions with customs or inspectors as to why we are "smuggling" and reselling Australomussa as Lobophyllia.

Australomussa occur in several color variations, with the greatest diversity at the northern end of their range in Indonesia. There the species is now even propagated in mariculture. It is easy to make frags, which usually grow vigorously - as long as you have a coral saw. Little demands are made to the water quality, nutrient-rich water is preferred and the KH should not drop too strongly. The lighting should be dimly weak, because the animals can burn easily.

Bartholomea is a genus of sea anemones and related to the hated Aiptasia. There are only a handful of species, the only one of aquaristic importance here is Batholomea annulata, which comes into the trade from time to time. It is a species from the Caribbean, which occurs on sand and rubble areas and hides in crevices or under larger boulders, sometimes e.g. in the shells of the giant fencer snail (Aliger/Lobatus gigas). The up to 200 tentacles grow up to 30 cm long and are transparently ringed. They possess zooxanthellae and can therefore feed on light. They often live in symbiosis with anemone or cleaner shrimp like Periclimenes yucatanicus or Ancylomenes pedersoni.

Blastomussa is a genus of stony coral and is classified as a large polyp stony coral. In the aquarium trade the species Blastomussa merleti with small polyps and Blastomussa wellsi with larger polyps can be found regularly.

Blastomussa vivida can only be found in the trade ocassionally, but it is not easy to distinguish it from B. wellsi. Differentiation is possible on the basis of polyp size - polyps of B. merleti are usually max 7 mm, Blastomussa wellsi usually 9-14 mm, and Blastomussa vivida have very large polyps up to 25 mm. Also, Blastomussa vivida grow flatter skeletons than the other two species.

Normal color variations of Blastomussa are green in the center with a red or gray-purple border, and less commonly completely green, purple, or red. All species are unproblematic to keep and can handle a variety of water parameters, as long as the KH remains constant and they do not get too much light and burn. They like slightly elevated nutrient levels and can be target fed supplemental LPS pellets or frozen food, but this is not usually necessary.

Blastomussa merleti - by the way only spelled with one T, the spelling "Blastomussa merletti" is incorrect - is a stony coral species, whose exact classification to one family is currently scientifically uncertain - "incertae sedis". It is found in the western and central Indo-Pacific. It is popular in marine aquariums because it is quite easy to keep. The difference between Blastomussa merleti and Blastomussa wellsi is the size of its polyps: these are much smaller in B. merleti. The normal coloration is red-green, but rarely green or purple specimens are encountered. Due to the relatively well separated polyps it can be fragmented even with simple tools.

Blastomussa merleti

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Blastomussa merleti

Briareum is a genus of soft corals that resemble stolonifera in appearance, but are actually classified as horn corals or gorgonians because of their skeletal structure. Briareum grow primarily in a encrusting pattern over hard substrates such as rocks or coral skeletons. The tissue is usually fleshy beige to pink, the tentacles and polyps often fluorescent green, sometimes with a white oral disc. Therefore, it is also referred to in English as the "Green Star Polyp".
In Briareum violaceum, which is often sold - including by us - under the synonym "Pachyclavularia", all tissue is instead distinctly purple. The polyps clearly show why this species belongs to the Octocorallia, the eight-stranded flower animals - they each have eight pinnate tentacles.

Briareum are popular soft corals for aquarium care because they are very easy to keep, have an attractive green coloration and move in the current. They have few water quality requirements and like increased nutrients, tolerating weak to stronger lighting and strong currents. They can reproduce quickly and tend to proliferate if conditions are right, which is something to be aware of when placing them. After stress, the polyps can sometimes remain closed for several days, but as long as the coral is not in the process of dissolving, it is usually still alive.

Capnella is a genus of tree soft corals, the best known representative of which is the Kenya tree Capnella imbricata. The corals got the popular name because they were often exported from East African countries, but they are also found in Indonesia and the rest of the Indian Ocean. Kenia Tree Capnella imbricata are hardy and fast growing soft corals, especially when nutrient supply is high. Sometimes they become a nuisance due to their fast growth - single arms can even detach and reattach elsewhere.

Propagation of the Capnella coral is easily possible via frags - simply cut them off with a ceramic knife or similar and clamp them in a stone crevice or pin them down with a syringe needle and a piece of tubing as a stopper.

Often the color is a hard to define grayish-purple-brown, with some specimens being greenish or yellowish. The color intensity often diminishes greatly when the specimens are fully open and expanded.

Catalaphyllia is also called elegance coral and belongs to the large polyp stony corals. The genus is monotypic, having only one species, Catalaphyllia jardinei. We suppose the name comes from its ability to extremely large tissue expansion in comparison to the much smaller skeleton, which is really surprising. It belongs to the relatives of Euphyllia and similar corals.

The coral Catalaphyllia jardinei has a bad reputation and is sometimes considered difficult to keep, which probably comes from old import experiences from Indonesia, where the quality of care during holding before export often left much to be desired and the animals were not fit. Currently the species may only be imported from Australia, where the quality is much higher and the animals are kept in good conditions like other Australian LPS.

Catalaphyllia jardinei has a powerful sring, so that even for humans caution is advised on thin-skinned areas and wounds. Since they expand their tissue widely, they should be placed further from other corals. They like low light and medium strong current, and tolerate higher nutrient levels. They can also be fed selectively, especially if they currently sting strong and feel "sticky". They are sensitive to low KH.

Most Catalaphyllia are basically green. More rarely, neon yellow-green specimens occur, and more rarely purple or reddish colorations. The tentacle tips are most variable - these come in gray, pink, blue and very rarely yellow, the latter mainly from Western Australia. White tips can appear slightly pink due to the contrast to the green tissue, so you have to look closely to see if they are actually pink - and to make matters worse, these gray tips are also sometimes referred to as "pink" by suppliers.

Caulastrea is a genus of stony coral that belongs to the LPS (Large Polyp Scleractinia - large polyp stony corals). A common incorrect spelling is "Caulastrea".
They are widely used in the saltwater aquarium industry and are referred to as Flute Coral, Trumpet Coral, or Candy Cane Coral for the aquarium. Several species are known, including Caulastraea tumida and Caulastraea furcata, but an exact distinction is rarely made, as the skeleton of dead specimens would have to be examined microscopically for an exact identification.
Caulastraea have fleshy, cone-shaped polyps that sit at the end of a Branch-like skeleton. Although the polyps are completely separated, they are so densely packed that no interstitial spaces remain and they form a closed colony surface. The polyps reproduce by division. Neon yellow-green, mint or bicolored color varieties with beige or dark brown are common among the color morphs. Rarely striped specimens are also available. Frags can be made easily with Caulastraea by cutting off the individual branches with coral nippers or diagonal cutters. As a large-polyped stony coral, it has few demands on water quality in the marine aquarium and gets by with less light.

Because of the easy husbandry, good divisibility for Frags, robustness and bright color morphs Caulastraea are very popular in the marine aquarium and highly sought after especially by beginners and for newer tanks.

Cerianthus are anemones, also known as cylinder rose. What makes them special is that they live in a tube made of parchment-like material that they excrete. Normally they bury themselves deep in the sand, the necessary substrate height can be a logistical challenge to the marine aquarist - one option is PVC tubes filled with sand. Cylinder roses are azooxanthellate and feed predatorily on fish or invertebrates. They should be actively fed and you may have to accept that smaller tank inmates will end up on their menu as well. The genus is widespread and has tropical species as well as species with northern or temperate distribution. Especially for the marine aquarium the species that have neon fluorescent coloration are particularly interesting.

Cespitularia is a soft coral from the Xenia family. This genus often causes confusion with other tree soft corals, so that it is also often found in the trade under other names. Their distribution covers the Indian and Pacific Ocean from the African coast to Australia.

The special thing about Cespitularia erecta is mainly its coloration - this is often blue or purple iridescent-iridescent, which makes these corals unique.

Important for the growth and coloration of Cespitularia is an adequate supply of iodine and other halogens, which should be added with a high-quality trace element mixture. Cespitularia erecta is difficult to propagate because it is hard to attach - it is best to place frag rocks on the side, wait until they become overgrown, and then disconnect them from the mother colony.

Chalice is a collective term for a number of "chalice-shaped" large polyp stony corals, which are very difficult to distinguish from each other on the living animal and on sight. For example, Echinophyllia, Echinopora, Echinomorpha, Mycedium, Oxypora, and Acanthastrea echinata are sometimes referred to as Chalice. These stony corals are extremely popular as there are fantastic color morphs, from forms referred to as Watermelon and Rainbow to Afterburner, Convict, Mummy Eye, Mindbender, Hollywood Stunner and many more.

Although the name suggests a cup-shaped growth, many Chalices are not free-standing, but encrust creeping over rock. Since a wide variety of species are traded as Chalices, growth rates range from very slow to moderately fast. Generally, most Chalices like a shady location around 40 PAR, with very blue-heavy light color for good color development. If the light intensity is too high, they easily get burned and bleach. Important for a good development are also higher nutrient values: especially phophate should be present and detectable, optimally around 0.1 mg/l, with nitrates around 10-20 mg/l.

When placing chalice corals, care should be taken that many among them can sting powerfully and form surprisingly long fighting tentacles. Therefore, it is best to place them at a generous distance from other corals.

Clavularia is a genus of Stolonifera, a type of encrusting softcoral. They are sometimes traded under such exotic names as "clove polyps" due to the shape of the contracted polyps. Clavularia viridis coral is very common species. The genus is chronically misidentified with, for example, Anthelia due to its similar shape, but which can be distinguished because it lacks the stolon (the "tubes") that remain when the polyps retract in Clavularia, or with Briareum due to a persistent literature error. There are different colored variants available to buy, popular are for example the "Tricolor" or "Fireworks" morphs.

Caring for Clavularia corals is unproblematic. With suitable water parameters they can grow to become a nuisance, but the creeping stolon is quite easy to detach from the rock, which makes them still containable. Nevertheless, especially in nano tanks you should choose the location carefully or make frags regularly.

If the Clavularia viridis does not feel well, the polyps remain closed - sometimes for several weeks. The animal is dead only when it starts to show bacterial decay (white fungus-like growth, bad rotting smell). There are few demands on the water quality - Clavularia viridis feel well even with higher nutrient values and are therefore suitable for beginners or new setups.

Condylactis is a genus of anemones with representatives found all over the world - for example the golden anemone Condylactis aurantiaca in the Mediterranean Sea or - much more interesting for us saltwater aquarists and the only representative in our aquariums - the giant Caribbean sea anemone, giant golden anemone ot Haitian anemone Condylactis gigantea. Typical is a quite compact body with long, thin tentacles.

Cycloseris is a genus of mushroom corals (Fungiidae) that live mostly free on sandy substrates. It belongs to the Fungia family, and like other corals of this family, it has recently undergone many taxonomic revisions. In the course of these, species living colonially on substrates have also been included, such as many of the former Cosicinaraea species that have multiple mouths. Interesting new additions are also the former Diaseris species, some of which can self-fragment frags as in Cycloseris (Diaseris) fragilis, making some Cycloseris also propagable. The differentiation of Fungia from Cycloseris is only obvious during development - Fungia are still attached to the substrate as young specimens and detach from it only in the course of growing up with a scar that is also visible later, while Cycloseris grow up completely free.

The identification is also otherwise difficult and the relationships to other mushroom corals are not always easy to distinguish, which results in many mixups, especially because there is an active taxonomic chaos. In the marine aquarium, Cycloseris are easily kept on the aquarium floor. The animals are freely mobile, which must be taken into account when setting up the tank in order to avoid stinging. At night, they may swell up and drift away with the current. They also do not like to be constantly buried by fish such as Digger Gobies, although they can free themselves from sand by peristaltic inflating.

Rather few demands are made on water quality and light. Injuries can be regenerated, it is even possible to fragment them, but they often grow back slowly and the damage is visible for a long time.

Cynarina is a coral genus of LPS. They are solitary living single polyps, which usually can show a strong tissue expansion. Cynarina can massively expand their tissue, sometimes reaching up to 35 cm in diameter, while their skeleton only grows to about 15 cm. Fortunately, they sting only weakly, so that other corals are seldomly endangered; however, one should watch out for the Cynarina. The sharp skeleton can partially puncture the tissue if the coral is exposed to greater stress, for example during transport - but it often heals quickly.

There is disagreement about how many species actually exist - the teardrop coral Cynarina lacrymalis is the only confirmed species, while the other representatives of the genus like Cynarina deshayesiana or Cynarina macassarensis are often classified only as subspecies or variants of them, depending on the author's whims. A famous example is Acantophyllia, which today is considered a synonym of Cynarina lacrymalis and differs from it by more opaque tissue. The genus is also often confused with Scolymia/Homophyllia because it has a similar solitary lifestyle. The distribution range extends from the Red Sea across the Indo-Pacific to Indonesia and Australia.

Cyphastrea is a coral genus belonging to the large polyp stony corals (LPS = Large Polyp Scleractinia). The coral colonies of most species grow flatly encrusting over the substrate, or in lumpy boulders. Only Cyphastrea decadia grows branched. A clear separation of the species is really only possible microscopically from the skeleton, but many animals in the trade should be Cyphastrea serailia or Cyphastrea ocellina according to the distribution in the Indopacific. Popular color morphs are "Forest Fire" or "Meteor Shower", for example.

Cyphastrea can be distinguished from Montipora and other flat growing stony corals by the fact that the polyps are crater- to nodule-shaped and the space between them is normally smooth.
The location of Cyphastrea stony corals in the marine saltwater aquarium should be shady, in our tanks the mother colonies become most beautiful at about 40 PAR. About the care: Slightly increased nutrient values are good for growth. Cyphastrea are well suited to occupy vertical surfaces on pillars similar places, as they grow well on these even with little light.